The Possessed

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Release date: October 04, 1974
Venue: Yale Repertory Theatre
Directed by: Andrzej Wajda
Literature: Albert Camus
Costume Design: Krystyna Zachwatowicz
Set Design: Krystyna Zachwatowicz

"The Possessed" depicts the destructive chaos caused by outside agitators who move into a moribund provincial town. The enigmatic Stavrogin's (Christopher Lloyd) magnetic personality influences his tutor, the liberal intellectual poseur Stepan Verkhovensky (Jerome Dempsey), and the teacher’s revolutionary son Pyotr (Stephen Rowe), as well as other radicals. When Stavrogin loses his faith in God, however, he is seized by brutal desires he does not fully understand.

Christopher Lloyd (Nicholas Stavrogin), Landon Storrs (Matriosha), Robert Brutein (Tikhon), Charles Levin (Grigoriev, the narrator), Alvin Epstein (Alexey Kirilov), Steven Nowicki (Ivan Shatov), Meryl Streep (Lisa Drozdov), Elzbieta Lebyatkin (Maria Lebyatkin), Jeremy Geidt (Captain Lebyatkin), Norma Brustein (Stavrogin Prascovya Ivanovna), Mary van Dyke (Drozdow , Daria Pavlovna), Kay Tornborg (Shatov), Jerome Dempsey (Stepan Trofimovich, Verhovensky), Joseph Capone (Liputin), Ralph Drischell (Shigatov), John Rothman (Virginsky), Christopher Durang (The Student), Michael Lassell (Lyasmshin), Ralph Redpath (Alexey Yegorovich), R. Nersesian (Maurice Nicolaevich), Stephen Rowe (Peter Stepanovich, Verkhovensky), Paul Schierhorn (Fedka), Franchelle Stewart Dorn (Virginska), Linda Atkinson (A Schoolgirl), Barry E. Marshall (Captain), Kate McGregor-Stewart (Maria Shatov), Barry E. Marshall (A Priest), Coleman Allen, Peter Blane, Michael Cadden, Paul Cooper, Peter C. Crawford, Charles Gunn, Thomas Holaday, Stephen J. Miklos, Tony Schlaff, Richard Taus (The Demons)

Dostoevsky’s work turned into a three-part play by Camus. Nihilism & individualism brought to the foreground thru the eyes of Russian intellectualism. “The Possessed” is Albert Camus’ last work, he died in 1960. It’s considered one of his finest achievements.