A batch of new magazine scans have been added to the gallery. First, scans from the most recent cover stories in Newsweek and the Spanish XL Semanal (as previously reported). Then, with thanks to Elmira, scans from the December issue of the Italian TU Style Magazine as well as from the July 2011 issue of Story Magazine (looks like a Russian version of Biography). And with thanks to Simona a 1986 article from the Italian La Domenica Magazine, covering the release of “Out of Africa”. Thanks everybody for contributing, enjoy reading!



Image Library > Magazine Scans > 2011 > Newsweek (USA, December 2011)
Image Library > Magazine Scans > 2011 > XL Semanal (Spain, December 2011)
Image Library > Magazine Scans > 2011 > TU Style (Italy, December 2011)
Image Library > Magazine Scans > 2011 > Story (Russia, July 2011)
Image Library > Magazine Scans > 1986 > La Domenica (Italy, March 1986)

Article courtesy USA Today: There’s a cellphone ringing in the swanky Waldorf-Astoria suite where Meryl Streep is sitting on the sofa, sipping coffee. She gropes through her oversized bag, finds her iPhone and checks its screen in passing. “Agent! Maybe I have a job,” she chortles. So many superlatives have been heaped upon Streep that it’s tough to separate the living legend from the flesh-and-blood woman with the lightly mussed hair jonesing for some caffeine. There’s a sparkle to Streep, 62, an innate warmth and a goofy sense of humor.

She wears the mantle of world’s greatest living actress lightly, apologizing when her dress gets askew and flashes a bit of skin, and admiring photos of your child before sighing that “it all goes so fast, so fast.” And, she’s quick to point out, there’s not a bounty of juicy roles for even her out there. “There aren’t that many movies around, available. There aren’t that many movies written that I could do. Sometimes they’ll take a villain’s part and turn it into a woman. There aren’t a lot of parts. There aren’t a lot of serious movies,” she says. “That’s all right. I like comedies, too.” But once in a great while comes a part so multidimensional, so delicious, so revelatory as to be irresistible. Such was the case with The Iron Lady, which stars Streep as Margaret Thatcher, the polarizing, controversial British prime minister who served from 1979 to 1990. Read the complete article at USA Today.

Meryl Streep is a dead ringer for former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on the cover of the new issue of Newsweek, out this week, as Entertainment Tonight has the first look. The new issue of the magazine delves into the British political powerhouse’s rise through the ranks. Streep plays Thatcher in the new biopic The Iron Lady, and the Oscar winner tells Newsweek, “While we were making the film, people had such strong and particular and specific venom for her. It was sort of stunning”. Edit: A similar cover is used for the Spanish XL Semanal magazine (read article), with thanks to Alvaro for the heads-up.

Excerpt and stunning outtakes from Vogue magazine: Never one to shirk a challenge, Meryl Streep takes on the iconic British prime minister Margaret Thatcher in her latest screen incarnation. She talks to Vicki Woods about women, power, and the view from the top.

“Oooh, they have oysters,” says Meryl Streep, perusing the menu with intent. “Would you like to get some oysters? Wouldn’t oysters be great to eat right now?” It’s 4:20 in the afternoon. We are the only people in the restaurant on the mezzanine at Union Station, Washington, D.C. I pass, but Streep says, “I think I’ll have some oysters. And a glass of Chardonnay.” The waitress, who is fizzing with efficiency and controlled celebrity-awareness, makes to whisk off, but Streep calls her back on a sudden thought: “Do you have fresh oysters?” Her face has the look of a woman who has spent the day Being Meryl Streep in order to publicize her upcoming movie, The Iron Lady, and now is yearning to slurp down oyster after leisurely oyster, raw and briny on the half-shell, mmm, maybe with lemon, maybe not. The waitress says firmly that all of their oysters are fresh. Streep says, “I know. But. Um…. Don’t worry about it.” And with a tiny sigh, she awaits them fried in bread crumbs. The complete article can be read on Vogue’s website and in the magazines archive.

What a fantastic treat to start 2012 – Meryl Streep will be cover girl for the January 2012 issue of Vogue Magazine. Featuring a stunning new photoshoot by Annie Leibovitz, this comes just in time for the theatrical release of “The Iron Lady” and the 2012 awards season. A preview of the cover can be found in the image library, scans from the magazine will be posted as they become available. Vogue will hit US newsstands on December 20, so make sure to grab your copy. Thanks to everybody for the heads-up!

In a recent interview with The Inquirer, which was conducted at the New York press conference of “The Iron Lady”, Meryl Streep talks about the new film and how much portraying Margaret Thatcher has changed her opinion. She has also confirmed that “Mommy & Me” is indeed going to happen, as Tina Fey is currently writing the script. An excerpt of the interview can be read below, the full piece is here. “Margaret Thatcher was the head of the United Kingdom for 11 and a half years and she did not have a cook. I have a cook. The last movie that I stopped making dinner was “Sophie’s Choice.” That was a long ago. Now I’m back cooking because everybody’s grown up. I imagine that Margaret Thatcher wanted to make dinner for Denis every night. Even when it was take-out from Marks & Spencer, they would sit down and have it together. She forgot to eat a lot. That’s something I have never done. She had prodigious amounts of energy and worked late into the night. She required all the cabinet ministers to be up there in the apartment with her. She’d work and work and Denis would come in and say, “Woman, you got to feed these men.” She’d go in and whip up some horrible rarebit or something and give it to them. All that surprised me”.

When people say Meryl Streep is a great actress, they mean grand actress — one who calculates her moves, her makeup and her accent, and then turns up the thespic volume until her character risks becoming caricature. The tactic works when she plays Dragon Lady roles like the fashion doyenne in The Devil Wears Prada, less so in the more naturalistic settings of Mamma Mia! and Doubt. But given a famous woman to play, Streep eerily locates the voice, face and soul: of Julia Child in Julie & Julia and, with startling acuity, of Margaret Thatcher in this biopic. Smartly written by Abi Morgan (who co-wrote Shame) and directed by Mamma Mia!’s Phyllida Lloyd, the film spans nearly the complete life of Britain’s first female Prime Minister, from her youth as a greengrocer’s daughter through Oxford and her early years in the Conservative Party (when she is played by Alexandra Roach). Streep takes over in Maggie’s middle age and escorts the PM into a restless retirement, both haunted and warmed by the specter of her late husband Dennis (a marvelous Jim Broadbent). Her performance is a miracle of inhabiting, not editorializing; it turns the boss of 10 Downing Street into a woman meriting our sympathy and sadness. This time, grand is great. Full list and more articles on the Time website.

Scans from the November 27 issue of the British Live Magazine have been added to the image library. Many many thanks to Alvaro for guiding the magazine to me. Enjoy! Additionally, you can find a transcript of the article in the magazines archive.