Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again
On July 20, 2018, get ready to sing and dance, laugh and love all over again.
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Mary Poppins Returns
This Christmas, Emily Blunt stars in an all-new tale of Britain's most beloved nanny.
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Big Little Lies: Season 2
In 2019, Meryl Streep moves to Monterey for the second season of Big Little Lies.
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  December 5th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

Nice in-depth article by the Hollywood Reporter. Also, check the following update for their cover story: In late February, Steven Spielberg hit a wall. Six years after he had started work on period piece The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara — and just weeks before he was due to start filming in Italy — he couldn’t find a boy to play the lead. In need of distraction, he picked up a spec screenplay that his CAA agents had sent him, and fell in love. The Papers, as the script was then called, didn’t just tell the story of The Washington Post’s Ben Bradlee and Katharine Graham, both of whom he knew; it also touched on one of the most relevant issues of the day: freedom of the press, and Graham’s decision to publish the Pentagon Papers in 1971, at the risk of losing her family-owned newspaper. After mulling things over, Spielberg told his longtime production partner, Kristie Macosko Krieger, that he was going to shut down Mortara and immediately jump onto the other film, which he wanted in theaters by the end of the year. “Everybody thought that I was off my rocker,” he admits. “But the great thing about having these decades-long collaborations is that the whole scrimmage swung to the left and we seriously started to prioritize the bare necessities.” “He said, ‘Can we make this movie this year? Can it come out this year?'” recalls Macosko Krieger. “So I [went] to my editorial staff, my postproduction crew, and said, ‘I know we can shoot it, but can we post it in time?’ Because we were also in postproduction on Ready Player One, the gigantic movie at Warner Bros. We sat down and did a giant war room, and we felt pretty confident that we could make it work. But we knew it would be tight.” The complete article can be read over at the Hollywood Reporter.

  December 4th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

With the notable absence of President Donald Trump, the Kennedy Center on Sunday celebrated singers Lionel Richie and Gloria Estefan, rapper LL Cool J, television producer Norman Lear and dancer Carmen de Lavallade with honors for the arts. The Kennedy Center Honors are considered the highest recognition in the country for artists across many fields, and the importance of the annual event is usually underscored by a White House reception with the president and the first lady. Not this year. The White House said in August that Trump and his wife, Melania, would not attend, so that those honored could enjoy the event “without any political distraction.” The White House reception was also canceled after some honorees said they would boycott it. De Lavallade, 86, said she decided she could not attend such an event after Trump said both right- and left-wing extremists were at fault in a white supremacist rally in Virginia where one woman died. “Something in my soul … said no,” she told reporters. Meryl Streep kicked off a tribute to her one-time teacher De Lavallade, an actress and a dancer, who wiped tears from her eyes at the end of a powerful dance and musical performance of an American spiritual with a twist: “She’s Got the Whole World in Her Hands.” You can read more about the event over at Yahoo.com. CBS will broadcast the 40th Kennedy Center Honors show on Dec. 26. No official pictures of Streep’s appearance have been published so far.

  December 2nd, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

The Massachusetts Conference for Women recently announced that Meryl Streep and Viola Davis will be keynote speakers at the Massachusetts Conference for Women on Dec. 7 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. Adam Grant, top-rated Wharton Professor and best-selling co-author, with Sheryl Sandberg, of “Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy” will also deliver a keynote address. “We are delighted to welcome Meryl Streep, Viola Davis and Adam Grant to the main stage in Boston,” said Gloria Larson, board chair of the Massachusetts Conference for Women. “This standout lineup of speakers, icons in the arts and in business, are sure to inspire attendees in ways they will long remember.” The 13th annual Massachusetts Conference for Women will host over 10,000 attendees for a full day of networking, inspiration, professional development and personal growth. In addition to a standout lineup of keynote speakers, the nonpartisan, nonprofit event will feature breakout sessions led by more than 150 experts and industry leaders about topical issues including building networks, branding, work-life balance, managing up, happiness and civility in the workplace and life. Registration is now open for the Conference and more exciting speaker announcements are to come. To register or learn more about the Conference, Opening Night and the Workplace Summit, visit maconferenceforwomen.org. Thanks to Frank for the heads-up.

  November 30th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

The promotion for “The Post” is on a roll – here’s hoping it’ll last until its limited release on December 22. Yesterday, Meryl has attended a press conference for the film in Beverly Hills. On Monday, besides the aforementioned Q&A at the Directors Guild of America, a second Q&A has taken place at the SAG Foundation, with Streep, Hanks and Bradley Whitford in attendance. There are no official videos yet, so the mobile filmed ones have been added to the video archive, alongside a first batch of television spots.

Related Media:
Video Archive – Public Appearances – The Post Q&A at SAG Foundation (2017)
Video Archive – Public Appearances – The Post Q&A at Directors Guild of America (2017)
Video Archive – Public Appearances – The Post Q&A at AMC Lincoln Square (2017)
Video Archive – Career – The Post – Television Spots
  November 28th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

The National Board of Review today announced their 2017 honorees, with top honors including “The Post” as Best Film of the Year, Greta Gerwig as Best Director of the Year for “Lady Bird”, Tom Hanks as Best Actor of the Year for his performance in “The Post” and Meryl Streep as Best Actress of the Year for her performance in “The Post”. NBR President Annie Schulhof said, “The Post” is a beautifully crafted film that deeply resonates at this moment in time. We are so thrilled to award it our best film as well as to honor the wonderfully talented Greta Gerwig as our Best Director.” These awards are the latest citation of excellence by the National Board of Review, a tradition going back 108 years. This year 265 films were viewed by this select group of film enthusiasts, filmmakers, professionals, academics, students, many of which were followed by in-depth discussions with directors, actors, producers, and screenwriters. The National Board of Review’s awards celebrate excellence in filmmaking with categories that include Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor and Actress, Best Original and Adapted Screenplay, Breakthrough Performance, and Directorial Debut, as well as signature honors such as the Freedom of Expression and the NBR Spotlight Award. The honorees will be feted at the National Board of Review Awards Gala, hosted by Willie Geist, on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 at Cipriani 42nd Street. This is Meryl Streep’s fifth honor by the National Board of Review. She has won Best Supporting Actress in 1979 for Manhattan, The Seduction of Joe Tynan and Kramer vs. Kramer, Best Actress in 1982 for Sophie’s Choice and two Ensemble awards in 2008 for Doubt and in 2009 for It’s Complicated”.

  November 28th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

Thanks to IndieWire‘s Zack Sharf for assembling the first voices from critics who are allowed to speak about “The Post” on Twitter, while full reviews are embargoed until December 06, 2017. Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” is one of the last remaining Oscar contenders set to debut at the end of the year, and early reactions suggest the Pentagon Papers drama is going to be a major awards juggernaut. While we’ll have to wait a few more days for the review embargo to lift, critics who have seen the film have begun sharing their thoughts on social media and the first reactions are mostly glowing, especially in regards to Meryl Streep’s performance. “The Post” centers around the unlikely partnership between The Washington Post’s Katharine Graham (Streep), the first female publisher of a major American newspaper, and editor Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks), as they race to publish to the Pentagon Papers and reveal the truth about America’s involvement in Vietnam. The movie was co-written by “Spotlight” Oscar winner Josh Singer and features an ensemble cast that includes Alison Brie, Carrie Coon, David Cross, Bruce Greenwood, Tracy Letts, and Bob Odenkirk. IndieWire’s David Ehrlich calls “The Post” Spielberg’s best film since “Munich” and is one of many critics singling out Streep’s lead performance as one of the best of her career. Alissa Wilkinson of Vox says Streep gives her “best performance in ages,” while Peter Sciretta of /Film calls her “amazing.” According to Mark Harris: “I will say that what Meryl Streep does in this movie, building a narrative about her character with each line, move, and gesture, is, even by her standards, astounding.” “The Post” opens in select theaters December 22. Check out a roundup of first reactions after the cut.

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  November 28th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

A lenghty, very interesting article on “The Post” by The Guardian: It has been described as a Hollywood all-star team’s riposte to Donald Trump. Steven Spielberg’s new film, The Post, headlined by Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep, dramatises the Washington Post’s publication of the classified Pentagon Papers, which exposed government lies about the Vietnam war. But while there are well chronicled parallels between the administrations and obsessions of Trump and Richard Nixon, the movie is also provoking debate about the role of media as watchdog – and whether a similar leak today would survive partisan attempts to discredit the messenger. Spielberg consulted Daniel Ellsberg, the Rand Corporation strategic analyst who leaked the Pentagon Papers – a top-secret 7,000-page document detailing US strategy in south-east Asia from 1945 to 1967 – to New York Times journalist Neil Sheehan in 1971. It was a bombshell that revealed the White House knew it was fighting an unwinnable war. After the Nixon administration won a court injunction that stopped the presses, Ellsberg gave a copy of the documents to the Post and 17 other newspapers. The Times and Post fought the order for 15 days until the supreme court overturned the ban in a 6-3 decision. Justice William Douglas wrote: “The dominant purpose of the first amendment was to prohibit the widespread practice of governmental suppression of embarrassing information.” But the justice department still pursued a vendetta against Ellsberg. He went on trial in 1973 on charges of espionage, conspiracy and stealing government property. The charges were dismissed due to gross governmental misconduct and illegal evidence gathering against him. The Pentagon Papers were declassified in 2011 and released for the public. The complete article can be read over at The Guardian with many thanks to Glenn for the heads-up.

  November 28th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

Article courtesy Awards Daily on yesterday’s screening at the Directors Guild of America: The Director’s Guild Of America in Hollywood was packed to the brim last night in anticipation of the new film, The Post. Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, and Steven Spielberg along with screenwriters Liz Hannah And Josh Singer, Production Designer Rick Carter and Cinematographer Janusz Kaminski attended the post-screening Q&A. Spielberg humbly told the audience that he got all of his first choices for the film. He gave thanks to Ellen Lewis his casting director and said he’d always wanted to work with Bradley Whitford. “It was one of my favorite cast pictures that I’ve ever worked on.” Talking about the 70’s visual language of the film, Spielberg said there wasn’t a lot of time for him to do much pre-visualisation and he relied on his production designer, Rick Carter to present locations that were authentic to the period. He said, “I knew this was a thriller. A new room adventure story and I used a zoom lens.”

On how the era in which [Graham] lived, Streep said: “It was customary in certain circles. When people would have dinner parties and important topics came up the women excused themselves.” Streep replied referring to the dinner scene in the film where the women leave the dinner table when the men start talking about “important issues.” The three-time Oscar winner said she had read the book and spoke to Graham’s son, Don. “She was very uncertain. At work, she had so many people thinking she didn’t deserve to be where she was.” She added, “What the world was like, I try to tell young women how different it was very recently, in those leadership circles.”

Without having time to build sets, Carter found the printing house used by Broadway’s Playbill in White Plain that served as the printing room for the Washington Post. Spielberg said he was surprised to see how it worked and joked that he was obsessed with the printing machine. Hosted by Vanity Fair’s Rebecca Keegan, Streep said of working with Spielberg for the first time was surprised by, “how improvisatory, spontaneous, and living the process of making the movie is.” She joked that while she had never worked with Spielberg before, Hanks had done so, “150 times.” She added, “There was a boys story and a girls story and I felt a little bit isolated and out of the fun. I wasn’t invited to the pie.” She joked before talking about his craft and his camera work. “I got so excited coming to work every day.” The complete article can be read over at Awards Daily.

  November 20th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

USA Today reports about the Lincoln Square Q&A with more insights: There’s a reason why Tom Hanks never worked with Meryl Streep before The Post. “I failed my audition for Mamma Mia!” Hanks joked at a panel Sunday night, following the first New York screening of Steven Spielberg’s new movie at AMC Lincoln Square. Somewhat surprisingly, he “never came close (to co-starring with her). I never dreamed that it would be possible.” The Oscar winners certainly picked a timely film for their first vehicle together. Set in 1971, The Post (in select theaters Dec. 22, expands nationwide Jan. 12) centers on the unlikely partnership between The Washington Post’s Katharine “Kay” Graham (Streep), the first female publisher of a major American newspaper, and editor Ben Bradlee (Hanks), as they wrestle to publish the Pentagon Papers, a massive cover-up of government secrets spanning decades. Most of the action takes place over just a few days, with the drama stemming from the Nixon administration’s efforts to stop The Washington Post and The New York Times from printing top-secret information about the Vietnam War. The film’s resonance in the era of “fake news” and journalist bans from White House briefings wasn’t lost on Spielberg, who read Liz Hannah’s script just nine months ago and rushed it into production. “I need a motivational purpose to make any movie,” Spielberg said. “When I read the first draft of the script, this wasn’t something that could wait three years or two years — this was a story I felt we needed to tell today.” The complete article can be read over at USA Today.

“It was a relationship between a man and a woman that wasn’t based on any other feelings. It was a friendship that was so deep, it was like family. The script interested me because it was about the working atmosphere. This is so important right now to think about: the atmosphere in which men and women can deal with each other, especially if the woman is the superior. You see in the scene where she and Bradlee have breakfast, she treats him like he is the boss – and that’s usually how that works. There is an accommodation to the ego of the men.

  November 20th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

Steven Spielberg unveiled his latest movie, The Post, in New York City Sunday night with a screening and panel alongside Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep, Bob Odenkirk and Matthew Rhys. You can view the Q&A in the video archive on Simply Streep with many thanks to GoldDerby. The Fox newspaper drama recounts how the Washington Post’s publisher Katharine Graham (Streep) and editor Ben Bradlee (Hanks) teamed up to catch up with The New York Times and publish the Pentagon Papers, risking court sanctions to expose a massive cover-up of government secrets related to the Vietnam War that spanned three decades and four U.S. Presidents. Alison Brie, Carrie Coon, David Cross, Tracy Letts, Sarah Paulson, Jesse Plemons, Michael Stuhlbarg, Bradley Whitford and Zach Woods are among the ensemble cast of the movie, which is dedicated to the late Nora Ephron. Though reviews and social media judgments from those who attended the screening are under strict embargo, the audience at AMC Lincoln Square greeted Spielberg and the cast with a standing ovation. During the post-screening panel, Spielberg outlined how the movie quickly came together over the space of just nine months, from the moment producer Amy Pascal flagged Liz Hannah’s spec script to the movie’s first screening. An in-depth article can be found over at The Hollywood Reporter.

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