EXPLORE THE ARCHIVES
The Simply Streep Archives has gathered details on all of Meryl Streep's feature films, television, theatre and voice narration, and also features an extensive library of articles, photographs and video clips. You can browse the collection by Ms. Streep's career or through a year-by-year summary.
Dec 06
2020

This Summer, I have challenged myself to research Meryl Streep’s theatre performances during her time at Vassar and Yale, since information on this topic has always been limited. We have all read about her celebrated debut as “Miss Julie” at Vassar and then countless performances at Yale – but in order to understand her theatrical training, or awakening if you will, I wanted to find all the roles and playwrights that have shaped her acting in her forming years and made her such a sought-after talent during her training years that made her an instant star at the New York stages after her graduation. I’m happy to announce that I have succeeded with a comprehensive list of 46 plays that Meryl Streep participated in between 1969 and 1975, accompanied by cast lists, reviews and pictures. Among the great finds is the fact that “Miss Julie” was indeed a celebrated performance at Vassar, but not her only one. She performed in two plays at Dartmouth College during her exchange program in 1971, and we have even more information from her Summer stock jobs with the Green Mountain Guild and the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center. Also, did you know Meryl participated in a Wendy Wasserstein play in 1984? You’re about to find out on the career pages. Many thanks to Michael for his generous help and contributions. Below is a complete list of pictures that I have found during my research. Enjoy all the new additions.


Continue Reading

Dec 05
2020

Hello and welcome to the latest version of Simply Streep. I have used most of this year’s unexpected free time to work behind the scenes and make the site easier to access with all the material we have been able to collect and archive over the years. I must say it doesn’t feel like I’m fullly done with all the new changes – but then, the site has never felt finished, it probably never will be. But I wanted to present you all the new look in time for next week’s releases of “Let Them All Talk” and “The Prom”. I have come close to present “the archives” in the best possible way to include all essential information on Meryl Streep’s work with easy-to-browse links to related articles and appearances. And there have been lots of additions to the career pages, with much new material to be added within the next updates. There are also many new articles waiting to be added, so look forward to more updates this weekend. Until then, enjoy your stay on the new and improved Simply Streep.

Dec 05
2020

A couple of new videos have been added to the archive, including virtual appearances on “Good Morning America” alongside James Corden to promote “The Prom”, a first news segment from Extra TV and a lenghty press junket with the cast and crew of the film. More videos will be added as they arrive.

Related Media:

Video Archive – Career – The Prom – Press Junket
Video Archive – News Segments – Extra TV (December 04, 2020)
Video Archive – Talkshows – Good Morning America (December 03, 2020)

Dec 05
2020

As we’re simultaneously covering “Let Them All Talk” and “The Prom” for their December 10 and 11 releases, reviews for the latter have been released as well, and so far the Steven Soderbergh dramedy is sitting relaxed on a 100% at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a collection of top critics reviews:

Anthony Lane, The New Yorker: The first half of “Let Them All Talk” is barely there as a movie. Soderbergh seems to be sketching out ideas for a plot, and gingerly feeling his way into its moral possibilities, as if he were clinging to a rail, beside a heaving sea. And yet the Atlantic stays calm. Most of the action was filmed on the Queen Mary 2, during a crossing in August, 2019, and you’re never entirely sure to what extent the resident mortals are aware of the stars who have descended among them. Does the helpful member of the ship’s crew, giving directions to a lost and elegant lady, even realize that she is in the frame with Meryl Streep? “Let Them All Talk” belongs to the gang of speedy, shot-from-the-hip movies—like “Bubble” (2005), “Unsane” (2018), and “High Flying Bird” (2019) – that Soderbergh likes to fire off now and then, using the lightest and least obtrusive tools for the job. One of his legacies will be the encouragement of younger filmmakers, who will watch his no-frills ventures and say to themselves, “We may not have a Streep, but we’ve got a coffee machine, a script, and an iPhone 12. Let’s do it.”

Peter Debruge, Varity: As everyone from Robert Altman to Judd Apatow to the Duplass brothers have shown, some actors respond better to the demands of improvisation than others: That invitation to invention can make a film come alive, but it can also create a kind of pressure to be “on” — to do or say something memorable in the moment — and this cast is hugely variable in its aptitude for off-the-cuff brilliance. Streep is always a pleasure to watch, and her character is so much in her own head that her somewhat distracted-sounding delivery seems entirely plausible coming from a woman who overthinks everything.

Alonso Duralde, The Wrap: It’s a fascinating performance from Streep, even though Alice is the hardest character to get to know, between the secrets she’s keeping and the hauteur she has developed over the years. (“When did she start talking like that?” wonders Susan.) Even with all the walls the character throws up around her, Streep always lets the audience into the core of this woman, whether she’s relaxing around Tyler or trying to interpret Roberta’s mixed signals.

David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter: Always the intrepid storyteller, Steven Soderbergh proves an excellent match for brilliant short fiction writer Deborah Eisenberg in her first produced screenplay, Let Them All Talk. Much like the author, the main character here is a celebrated novelist who publishes infrequently and pays punctilious attention to every word, providing a succulent role for Meryl Streep. Her interplay with Candice Bergen and Dianne Wiest as the college friends she hasn’t seen in 35 years is enlivened by extensive improvisation, which gives this HBO Max original the enthralling spontaneity of vintage Robert Altman.

David Ehrlich, Indie Wire: This story, like the people in it, wouldn’t have held together on dry land, and there’s something wonderfully indulgent about surrendering to the undercurrents that swirl beneath Alice’s friendships. But the run-and-gun approach that makes this movie possible is also what ends up shooting it in the foot, as the clock is always ticking and Soderbergh never has time to get out of the shallows. There are moments where this threatens to crystallize into a shrewd portrait of how people ebb and flow out of each other’s lives over the years, but the film always falls back on its more frivolous pleasures, and the cringe-inducing “romance” between Tyler and Karen ends up becoming the sturdiest of its subplots.

Dec 05
2020
Dec 04
2020
Dec 04
2020